ARTLURKER

A Miami based contemporary art newsletter / blog

Photo Documentary: Miami Noir at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS

Miami Noir installation view. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

In keeping with media genres such as the crime drama and the computer game that paint Miami in a light that most who seasonally crash our shores for Spring Break, Memorial Weekend, Winter Music Conference and Art Basel Miami Beach rarely see, the exhibition Miami Noir at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS in New York, which opened on April 4th, provides a further glimpse at the dark undercurrents of our a murky metropolis that have been partially obscured in the last forty years by new money, real-estate ventures and luxury lifestyle marketing campaigns. In truth though, Miami is city conjured up out of the Florida swampland by ruthless ambition and criminal enterprise; a city struggling with moral ambiguity and sexual motivation, corruption, alienation and guilt.

 

Risa Needleman, co-owner of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS said: “I think Miami is an interesting city with a curious history. It’s gone through incredible highs and lows in terms of finance, culture and tourism. It seems to be a city that often struggles with its identity and its projected identity. In terms of the art world, Miami has become a pit-stop for the art fairs, and often people don’t look beyond that one week to its homegrown culture. That’s what I find so interesting about it. There’s a lot there, but no one looks and similarly there’s a lot that people don’t often get to see. I love how Miami sticks out like a sore thumb in a politically notorious state – look how much attention Florida has gotten in the past few elections! I love the death-by-design Art Deco up and down Miami Beach. I love the forgotten neighborhoods of the city sprawl. I love the swamplands and the everglades. Think of all these contradicting things that are identifiable with Miami – how could you not be drawn to its art? It’s a conflicted city, and that’s interesting to me.”

Curated by Adriana Farietta – a one time resident of Miami who saw first hand the change that occurred in the art scene with the advent of Art Basel Miami Beach – and comprised of all Miami artists, the exhibition professes an unabashed view of Miami through the eyes of those who not only know it best but make it their business to communicate. But as ever, there are also more general contingents as Benjamin Tisher, co-owner of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS pointed out: “While the artists in the show are making work directly inspired by Miami, the artwork is ultimately more universal in its appeal. The way I see it, Adriana is using Miami as only part of her curatorial criteria. That said: I also love the idea of bringing a show from Miami to New York as it is an inverse migration of our annual December art fair excursions.”

The work:

Jason Hedges, Untitled, 2009. Black peppercorns. Dimensions vary. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“Peppercorns are one of most used spices in the world today. They have been a desired commodity for a thousand years or so; notable examples of include spice trade from India and China as well as the later westward exploration by Christopher Columbus and other explorers looking for wealth and the later raping and pillaging of the British East Indian Trading Company. I am drawing lines between current desired commodities like fossil fuels and our thirst for them and our forefather’s thirst for spice. I have found myself asking why we haven’t learned from them and continue to repeat history again and again…” – Jason Hedges.

Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, Untitled (Lamp 2), 2009.Duct tape, packing tape, fabric, wood, trinkets. 29 x 22.5 x 10.5 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, Untitled (Lamp 2), 2009.Duct tape, packing tape, fabric, wood, trinkets. 29 x 22.5 x 10.5 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“The piece in Miami Noir is a functional lamp that I produced with Ernesto Oroza…the arm is wood wrapped in duct tape and fabric, and ornamented with different trinkets; the shade is made with transparent packing tape.” – Gean Moreno.

Naomi Fisher, Dirty Hand, 2008. Metallic c-print mounted on Plexiglas. 50 x 40 inches. Edition of 5. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“There is a wonderful sense of drama that comes with Naomi’s photographs. The lush environments that she constructs are extremely alluring, and the performance-aspect adds an incredibly dynamic conceptual layer to her work.” – Risa Needleman.

Matthew Schreiber, Incense Burner, 2009. Plywood, aluminum, Miami sand, Haitian incense, laser, mirrors. 31 x 28 x 12 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“The box is referencing similar “light boxes” built by artists (mainly in Europe) around 1930-1960.The form is based on a square derived from Sacred Geometry drawing methods. It uses smoke from incense (purchased from a shop in Little Haiti, Miami) to make the laser beams more visible.” – Matthew Schreiber.

COOPER, Simple pleasures, lonely recording studios, dull mirrors, quiet suicides, bad debts, the theater and its double. In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni, 2008. Wood, oilseed, blackboard paint, plaster, resin, cotton, acrylics, steel, concrete, soil, foam, copper, paper, epoxy and various hardware. 20 x 10 x 12 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

COOPER, Simple pleasures, lonely recording studios, dull mirrors, quiet suicides, bad debts, the theater and its double. In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni, 2008. Wood, oilseed, blackboard paint, plaster, resin, cotton, acrylics, steel, concrete, soil, foam, copper, paper, epoxy and various hardware. 20 x 10 x 12 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“COOPER’s artwork involving elements of alienation, disintegration and darkness in addition to having easily the longest title has arguably the darkest themes in the exhibition.” – Adriana Farietta.

Clifton Childree, It Gets Worse, 2008. Silkscreen on cardstock. 23 x 13 inches. Edition of 50. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Clifton Childree, It Gets Worse, 2008. Site-specific installation, 16mm film. Duration: 32 min. Edition of 10. Clifton Childree – Writer, Director, Producer, Cinematographer, Animator, Editor, all characters except Monkey Boy. Nikki Rollason- Monkey Boy. Laundry Room Squelchers – Noise/Music. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Clifton Childree, It Gets Worse, 2008. Site-specific installation, 16mm film. Duration: 32 min. Edition of 10. Clifton Childree – Writer, Director, Producer, Cinematographer, Animator, Editor, all characters except Monkey Boy. Nikki Rollason- Monkey Boy. Laundry Room Squelchers – Noise/Music. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Clifton Childree, It Gets Worse, 2008. Site-specific installation, 16mm film. Duration: 32 min. Edition of 10. Clifton Childree – Writer, Director, Producer, Cinematographer, Animator, Editor, all characters except Monkey Boy. Nikki Rollason- Monkey Boy. Laundry Room Squelchers – Noise/Music. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Clifton Childree, It Gets Worse, 2008. Site-specific installation, 16mm film. Duration: 32 min. Edition of 10. Clifton Childree – Writer, Director, Producer, Cinematographer, Animator, Editor, all characters except Monkey Boy. Nikki Rollason- Monkey Boy. Laundry Room Squelchers – Noise/Music. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“It Gets Worse is a nightmarish experimental 16mm slapstick horror film having the look and feel of a deteriorated vintage hand cranked moviola.  It takes places on an old steam ship where a sea captain is cursed by a coffin shaped nickel arcade game and the string of seedy events that follow the captain as he possesses supernatural power and becomes the ship’s tormented revenge-seeking Mr. Hyde.” – Clifton Childree.

Federico Nessi, Point The Light At The Mirror Being Held By The Person Reflecting It Back In Your Face, 2009. Site-specific mural (Xerox on newsprint, wheat paste, metal studs, thread, rhinestones, gloss gel). Variable dimensions. Edition of 5, each unique. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Federico Nessi, Point The Light At The Mirror Being Held By The Person Reflecting It Back In Your Face, 2009. Site-specific mural (Xerox on newsprint, wheat paste, metal studs, thread, rhinestones, gloss gel). Variable dimensions. Edition of 5, each unique. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“My piece represents the least literal representation of an action that has been a recurrent theme in my work – a man pointing a flashlight at a mirror that reflects the light back in his face.To me this image is simple and poetic and all-encompassing.  I am interested in seeing how different representations of this idea affect its basic message. For the piece in Miami Noir I wanted to strip down any direct interpretations of this image; I also wanted to step away from any traditional forms of photography. From a birds eye view of the action I created an eight point geometric pattern – I have been interested in sacred geometry as of late. Once the image got tiled on the wall (creating a mostly black surface) I focused on the details of black rhinestones and gold thread guilloche patterns. For this piece i heavily broke away from any sense of obsessive control. I made sure to trust the course of events and my reactions to them… In the end I got a wall I am extremely excited about… it is subtle and simple, but overwhelmingly obsessive when analyzed… just like me.” – Federico Nessi.

Daniel Arsham, New City (Street Level Study), 2009. Gouache on Mylar. 18 x 26 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Daniel Arsham, New City (From Above Study), 2009. Gouache on Mylar. 18 x 26 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

“Arsham’s drawings of an empty building that spells out “WANT” is a reference to all the half constructed buildings and/or vacant skyscrapers left in Miami. His works are haunting and agoraphobic, like a De Chirico painting, which is part of why I find them irresistible.” – Risa Needleman.

 

Daniel Newman, Enroute Geese II, 2007. Oil on canvas. 30 x 60 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

 

“It was impossible to get to NYC so I figured I would send the birds in my place…This is an interesting painting in that it has never seen daylight, though not intentionally, it’s just how these things go…It was painted in a dark alley in the middle of the night and was moved to a dank, dark windowless bathroom to dry… This was the bathroom of my old studio and this was my last work that I made there…The painting never left the bathroom and now, two years later, after being exposed to at least 38.7% of the Miami art scene’s genitalia it is finally seeing the light of day.” – Daniel Newman.

 

Nicolas Lobo, Untitled, 2009. Rope, felt, aluminum beads, photographs mounted on aluminum, Petroleum by-product on aluminum, fluorescent tubes and fixtures. 72 x 120 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

Nicolas Lobo, Untitled, 2009. Rope, felt, aluminum beads, photographs mounted on aluminum, Petroleum by-product on aluminum, fluorescent tubes and fixtures. 72 x 120 inches. Courtesy of INVISIBLE-EXPORTS.

 

“Nick made a wall macramé piece from various ropes and fabrics into which is interwoven images sourced from the DEA of drugs seized whilst attempting to be smuggled into the US in indigenous artifacts. The work has the DEA logo at its center and is built around three strip fluorescents. Macramé is easily recognizable as an indigenous art form, which echoes the subjects of the DEA images. The inter-woven, web-like aspect to the piece could also be said to comment on the DEA’s capacity and methodology in regard to their seizure of imported drugs.” – Adriana Farietta.

 

The official after party for Miami Noir at at B.East (the basement of Broadway East, 171 East Broadway) saw Miami artists Federico Nessi and Bert Rodriguez join forces with Miami’s DJ Nuit to form The Unified Field, a musical trio who in performing for the first time offered New York City a 6 hour long glimpse into bliss consciousness on the dance floor. Below are some images from the event and the video that was screened on the evening. Dj’s from the Unified Field can be found performing regularly at Bella Rose, 423 16th Street, Miami Beach FL 33139.

 

Federico Nessi and Sara Freidin aka DJ Healer and DJ Nuit. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Bert Rodriguez and Federico Nessi aka The Whisper and DJ Healer. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Crowd (no one in particular). Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Steve Pestana & Anne Han. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Agathe Valantin, Sabrina Mesbahi and Aurelie Stephan. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Nina Arias and Sabrina Mesbahi. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Crowd (no one in particular). Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Bert Rodriguez, Federico Nessi and Sara Freidin aka The Whisper, DJ Healer and DJ Nuit. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Federico Nessi aka DJ Healer and Jason Hedges. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

Adriana Farietta, Jonathan Smith and Eric Beare. Photo Credit: Nina Arias

The Unified Field I, (2009). Bert Rodriguez, Federico Nessi and Sara Freidin.

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Miami Noir is the fifth show at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS, a new New York gallery dedicated to superior conceptual art, promoting the talents of individual artists dealing in tangible and intangible components, and working well with others.

INVISIBLE-EXPORTS is located in the Lower East Side, at 14A Orchard Street, just north of Canal. The hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11-6:30pm, and by appointment. For more information, call 212 226 5447 or email: info@invisible-exports.com.

Miami Noir curator Adriana Farietta works at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in Brooklyn, NY. She previously worked for Scope Art Fair, Locust Projects in Miami, Florida and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, CA. She has curated and produced exhibitions in Miami, New York City and the Hamptons.

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4 Comments

  • whl

    wow wish i was there! congrats to adriana and the artists she sleceted! Love the hedges work…i’m still thinking about it!

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Photo Documentary: Miami Noir at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS