ARTLURKER

A Miami based contemporary art newsletter / blog

New Form for Miami Heavy Hitters Fredric Snitzer and Emmanuel Perrotin.

Robert Chambers, In sit U, 2003. Birch Wood, plywood, steel, electrical components, LED Flood light, hydraulic cylinder and pump, timer, 72″ x 84″ x 34″. Image sequence reversed for near-comedic effect.

ARTLURKER APOLOGY: DEAR READERSHIP, IT HAS COME TO LIGHT THAT ROBERT CHAMBERS AND JIAE HWANG HAVE NOT BEEN DROPPED BY FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY. DESPITE OUR CONTACTING THE GALLERY NUMEROUS TIMES WE ULTIMATELY FAILED TO OBTAIN PROPER CONFIRMATION OF THE FACTS AND AS SUCH SHOULD NOT HAVE PROCEEDED TO MAKE A POST THAT COULD HAVE INCLUDED ERRONEOUS INFORMATION. PLEASE KNOW THAT THIS IS A RARE CIRCUMSTANCE AND THAT THE POST WAS MADE WITH THE VERY BEST POSSIBLE INTENTIONS. IT WAS OUR MISTAKE AND WE ARE TRULY SORRY TO THESE ARTISTS, FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY AND FOR ANY REPERCUSSIONS. THOSE PROCEEDING TO READ THIS POST FOR THE FIRST TIME PLEASE NOTE THAT ROBERT CHAMBERS AND JIAE HWANG HAVE NOT BEEN DROPPED BUT THAT EVERYTHING ELSE CHECKS OUT. KIND REGARDS, THOMAS AND THE TEAM AT ARTLURKER.

A quick perusal of Fredric Snitzer Gallery’s website revealed recently that emerging artist Jiae Hwang and scene veteran Robert Chambers have been dropped; replaced it would seem by Miami based conceptual knitter, Jim Drain and Canadian sculptor/painter of farcical malevolence, Jon Pylypchuk. A few blocks North of Fredric Snitzer, Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin is trying on a few new artists of their own for size. In addition to recently signing on Jesper Just, Bharti Kher, Cary Kwok and designer Eric Benque, Perrotin is opening their season on September 13th with fine art greenhorn KAWS, who was recently picked up by Gering & Lopez in New York and British sculptor Conrad Shawcross, who is represented alongside Snitzer’s Hernan Bas at Victoria Miro in London.

Conrad Shawcross, The Nervous System, 2003. Mixed media. Dimensions variable.

With each new season there are changes and lately, Snitzer’s and Perrotin’s line ups become ever increasingly entwined – their tastes ripening together in the sun as they prepare for the fairs. The loss of accessibility to Hwang’s illustrative musings and the knowledge that the last bastion of Chambers’ legacy in Miami has finally jettisoned him outside of our convenient reach is quite heavy news but so too are these new recruits.

Jim Drain, iii open iii closed, 2007. Mixed media sculpture. Dimensions variable

Represented by Greene Naftali Gallery in New York, Miami based artist Jim Drain has long been plundering international markets; as such this recent alliance with Snitzer seems somewhat unnecessary, but welcome and exciting. Having signed with Snitzer, Drain again pairs professionally with girlfriend Naomi Fisher who was coincidentally dropped by Perrotin – the couple had worked closely together in their studio/gallery space Bas Fisher Invitational until recently.

Left: Jon Pylypchuk, I miss you, danger, and all its elements, 2006. Wood, wood glue, fake fur, hot glue, watercolor, polyurethane, cotton, 84 x 94 x 122 cm. Right: Jon Pylypchuk, I will wait for you to get up/ you will wait for a long time, 2006. Mixed media on panel, 198 x 198 cm

Joining Drain as a newbie at Snitzer is Jon Pylypchuk whose sculptures mirror the naked state of the human condition. Where as artists like Francis Bacon concentrated on the sick, the dark and the twisted side of the human psyche, Pylpchuk’s tragic-comic figures made from scraps of wood and remnant fabric, or emblazoned on syrupy canvases with glitter, felt and glue, inspire feelings of pitiful irony. By the depicting the aged menace of the human spirit as various abused cuddly creatures or clumsy guileless characters, malevolence is quelled into frail humility.

Left: Jiae Hwang, 3rd star child, 2006. Colored pencil on mylar layers, 14 x 11. Right: Robert Chambers, Merkhet and ZenRay, 2001. Fiberglass, Kevlar, get coat, electrical components, synchronized soundtracks and light elements.

Hwang had been associated with Snitzer since graduating from New World School of Visual Arts she was showcased with Perrotin for their exhibition Miami Nice in Paris in 2004. Having afforded such attention it might seem to many that Hwang is slowing down but with an exhibition history that spans a host of countries including Japan, Iceland, Norway, France, the UK and the US; and with commissions from MTV and NASA there is clearly grounds to expect a lot more.

Chambers who has long been a staple of South Florida arts and whose works can be found in various museums, collections and hotels throughout Miami also participated in the Miami Nice exhibition. With the advent of his removal from Snitzer’s books the artist now appears to have finally made his exit.

Robert Chambers, Rotorelief, 2002. Modified helicopter, stainless steel, aluminum, fiberglass 18’ x 14’ x 7’

It’s easy to get sentimental about artists and galleries but changes are par of the course and any artist worth their salt realizes that being dropped from their gallery, despite being initially crushing, can be a positive thing. Those close to either artists or the galleries are often sucked into a world of side taking and whispers leading up to and immediately after the axe has fallen but these temporary divisions, suspicions and collisions of fortune are soon forgotten as the enduring creative spirit pushes on, healing faster than time the jilted, the down trodden and the weary. It may be hard at first to pick up your brush, camera or reciprocating saw and get back on the horse but in the end its what you do and in the long run the unique support systems available to artists in Miami will remain, making come backs easy in this big, bouncy, beautiful boob of a town.

For more information about these galleries please visit: www.snitzer.com & www.galerieperrotin.com

5 Comments

  • I was there

    It’s the gallery owners who are nursing on the milky teat of the artist the worldover.

    This current system is flawed and will only change when artists take it over and hire the gallery owners as studio assistants and gophers.

    Gallery owners do very little but hold a set of keys to a warehouse and have the phone numbers of the easily duped collectors.

    Hwang has been associated with Snitzer since getting her education and graduating from New World School of Visual Arts, where Mr. Snitzer teaches some classes. [This is another story]

    Mr. Chambers has been active in NYC as much as in Miami. Being dropped from Snitzer will not do much to stop the Human Dynamo that is Robert Chambers.

    Perhaps I am missing an important aspect of the picture but the fact remains that the artists can survive without the gallery owners, but the gallery owners will disappear without the artists.

    ARTISTS OF THE WORLD ARISE AND UNITE!

  • swampthing

    It’s pimpology 101, choose a role, pimp, whore or john. Given today’s parameters, there is plenty of talent. Gallerists are proportionate to the shortage of patrons.

  • Richard_haden

    Many artist go public with their work. As this happens the gallery is less significant. One Artist that I can think of, is Jonathon Borofsky. http://www.borofsky.com/ Borofsky who was very active in commercial galleries in the 80′s and 90′s, is mostly involved in Public art projects these days. As entity in himself the audience he reaches is of the pedestrian tread.

    As for Chambers; I think that he is on a similar path; his ambition is similar as well. Art in public places not art in private places. Why take up valuable web site space at a gallery when one is rarely involved in gallery/collector commerce (an Archive is more appropriate) The lack of an Artist works in the commercial gallery system can be meaningless…especially if you look back historically to Site specific happenings or even the Day of WPA grandeur. It is hard to collect a commission on things outside the gallery…and if one is not interested in Art Star celebrity status then…well, that is another topic.

    The White Cube is just a facet of the greater cultural refuse left behind by human trace. Art is something else (Adorno) [sic].

    I wouldn’t worry about Robert.

    Richard Haden

  • Sunshine

    Fredric Snitzer Gallery has confirmed that information (previously announced on Artlurker.com) about dropping Robert Chambers and Jiae Hwang is false. The reason given for the lack of their inclusion on Snitzer.com is that the web site is currently under construction. This story with was fabricated based on a simple assumption without proper research. I believe Artlurker owes an apology to its audience and to both Mr. Chambers & Miss Hwang for misguiding readers and the community with this erroneous article.

  • Robin

    I just have to say that if you are in search for talent then my friends your search will never end because you will get tired of searching but the talent will never end, anyways I loved your blog

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New Form for Miami Heavy Hitters Fredric Snitzer and Emmanuel Perrotin.